So, it’s been awhile, right? I opened my big mouth and put it out there that I’d do a video series installing Kubernetes (K8s) and OpenFaaS on 3-Node Intel NUC cluster. Of course, I’ve never installed K8s and other than knowing Alex Ellis, the leader of the open source project for OpenFaaS, I don’t know the first thing about running functions on containers. Oh, did I forget to mention, other than installing Linux, I really shouldn’t be left to my own devices with a Linux console. On top of all that, I’m pretty rusty touching deep technology.

With all that said, why in the world did I commit to doing such an ambitious project before investigating the level of challenge?

Because if I would have looked before I leaped, I would have never committed to doing it. I do these types of naive things to force myself outside of my comfort zone. At the end of the project, I’ll have a better perspective on the challenges of modernizing not only an IT infrastructure but the effort a team needs to undertake to understand such a drastic shift in technology.

How is it going?

It’s near the end of day-1. I’ve watched some Alex’ YouTube video on installing K8s. It’s based on his super popular blog post on the same. I also watched a couple of hours of Anthony Nocentio’s Pluralsight course Kubernetes Installation and Configuration Fundamentals. So far it’s an excellent course.

What I am having trouble with is getting my bearings on what I don’t know. I have over 20-years of experience in IT. I like to anchor learning new things on other topics I’ve mastered over the years. The best comparison I have is VMware vSphere. Installing vSphere is super easy. Managing vSphere is something completely different. With most technologies, I get a sense of what needs to be done to add value.

K8s is a different beast for me. Unlike vSphere, K8s is focused on the developer experience. My years of training helped me understand what I wanted out of vSphere and therefore what I needed to learn. K8s isn’t geared toward my day-to-day IT experience. I, therefore, have a difficult time grasping the vastness of the platform.

Conceptually, I get it. It’s not very difficult to understand the high-level value, use cases, or integrations. I can speak to executives and help them understand directionally how to approach it. It’s at the operator level that this is all new learning. As the saying goes, the devil is in the details.

I am having fun stepping out of my comfort zone and in a sense going back into the comfort zone of learning and touching and teaching new technology.

Make sure to subscribe to the YouTube channel as I share the resulting content. The videos themselves are geared to other people just like me. I’ll show all the things I had to learn along the way.

A Leap into Learning Kubernetes

One thought on “A Leap into Learning Kubernetes

  • June 15, 2019 at 3:44 am
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    I stood clear from installing k8s for a long time, because everyone kept telling me its very complicated. But now there is kubeadm. And what do you know? Installed a 3 node cluster in a lazy weekends afternoon.

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