I never understood why VMware requires you take a course to get certified for a technology as common as VMware vSphere. There might have been a time where it was needed. I imagine back when no one heard of x86 virtualization and the barrier to entry was high. But ESXi is free, VMware offers 60 days of evaluation to come up to speed, you can run it in the cloud or VMware Workstation/Fusion.

After listening to the latest VMware community podcast I became even more frustrated. If you are a practitioner that took a vSpehere 5 or even 4 course you can’t be certified in 6. Why? Is the test itself not an adequate measure of skill? At this point I believe it’s a reflection of VMware Education losing touch with the community.

Plenty of community training options

VMware has over 200 tasks related to the VCP blueprint on their Cloudcred website. vExperts have put out a ton of quality free training. Pluralsight has wonderful VMware training. Why o Why does anyone need to take a formal course in area that plenty of self-study material exists. It’s not like VMware vSphere is OpenStack or something.

For a quality post refer to @networkingnerd excellent rant from 2 years ago.

VMware’s classroom requirement for certification is still horrible
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4 thoughts on “VMware’s classroom requirement for certification is still horrible

  • May 21, 2015 at 10:39 pm
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    Hey Keith, I haven’t listened to the latest podcast but that’s not consistent with the Certification web site, unless you let your certification expire.

    The vSphere ICM 4.1 course I took was horrible, which is consistent with other VMware training I’ve been in (the View ICM training was so bad we all walked out and demanded a different instructor and our money back). The instructor was very wrong about a lot of significant things, to the point that students couldn’t complete labs if they’d been listening to him. In theory, requiring training guarantees a minimum level of competence but with such poor quality control in the classroom it’s basically a shakedown and a real waste of a week.

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    • May 21, 2015 at 10:42 pm
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      You are correct. In my case I let mine expire. I can go back and take my 5.x exam and then the 6.x exam which makes no sense. Why not just let me take the 6 exam straight off?

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    • May 26, 2015 at 3:21 am
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      Hey Bob and Keith,

      as a matter of fact I finally got my first VMware training last week and although I feared the quality of that course (version 6 VCP for the datacenter) would be bad, it struck me that the instructor only knew what was in the slides, had no significant experience with the product outside the training labs and that the training material didn’t even cover the whole exam. Also he was wrong about a number of references about VLAN tagging, he got SAN and storage mixed up and I simply stopped asking questions, since he could”t answer them of answered them incorrectly anyway.
      I’ve – sort of – slept through 5 days of 95% boring slides and can’t wait to learn more about what’s actually going to be covered by the version 6 exam, which is still in beta at this point.

      The best way to learn the product is experience! It always is.

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  • May 23, 2015 at 12:43 am
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    I can’t agree more
    The classes sometimes cover just the basics and requires studying separately and extensively for the certification

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